The real reason insurance premiums are ever above $50 a month

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learning
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Joined: Tue Jul 11, 2017 4:57 pm

The real reason insurance premiums are ever above $50 a month

Post by learning » Mon Jan 22, 2018 1:08 pm

https://mises.org/blog/how-government-r ... -expensive
Only the dumbest of asses think socialized medicine is a good thing.

https://www.heritage.org/health-care-re ... d-analysis
Health insurance markets are reg­ulated in a number of ways. This study focuses on four sets of regulations[11] that affect health insurance premiums:

Mandated benefitsregulations require insur­ers to cover particular treatments. Both server and provider mandates are included in this variable. Server mandates require insurers to offer coverage for particular medical condi­tions. Provider mandates require insurers to offer coverage for specific health care providers, such as chiropractors.
Health plan liabilitylaws create a cause of action against health plans and their employers for damages for harm done to enrollees under assorted liability theories.
Direct-access-to-specialistslaws allow sub­scribers to go directly to a specialist without prior referral from the health care plan primary physician.
Provider due processlaws interfere with a health plan's ability to contract selectively with a provider.[12]

https://www.heritage.org/health-care-re ... high-costs
Examples abound of how health insurance regulations have increased prices and disrupted insurance markets in many states. One common regulation is known as guaranteed-issue laws. These laws make it impossible for insurance companies to reject anyone who applies for health insurance. This sounds nice in theory, but it has costs that can price individuals and families out of the market.

Why? Because in states with guaranteed-issue laws, insurers are forced to provide coverage for people with pre-existing medical conditions, so they raise premiums on everyone else to cover these costs.

https://fee.org/articles/insurance-redl ... ervention/
Redlining is generally taken to mean the practice of refusing to provide a product or service within a given geographical region. The term comes from the image of an owner of a service firm drawing a red line around a portion of a map and deciding not to provide any service within that area. This could be a bank official declaring that the bank will not make any loans in the area, a retail drugstore chain declaring it will not put any stores in the area, or an insurance company deciding not to insure any risks in the area.

https://www.aier.org/blog/government-in ... alls-short
Obama care equals Satanism

https://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2017/11 ... -in-price/
The premiums are not an accurate representation of my risk.

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